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imagination ... The total performance is pedestrian to an extreme. Rather than a design for a coin, it is more like a medallion for a bottle of vintage brandy." Release, distributing and collecting Walter P. Nichols By letter dated July 21, 1936, the chairman of the Tercentenary Committee, George Wentworth, informed O'Reilly that his committee planned to deposit $15,000 to pay for the authorized mintage of 30,000 half dollars, plus a sum to pay for the Mint's expenses in striking the coins. Despite this, the Philadelphia Mint in early August 1936 struck only 25,000 pieces, plus 15 more held by the Mint to be examined at the 1937 meeting of the annual Assay Commission. Senator White, in a March 15, 1937 letter to Mint Director Nellie Tayloe Ross, stated that the committee had erred, thinking only 25,000 pieces were authorized. He hoped that to support additional fundraising, the remaining 5,000 could be issued, dated 1937, but the M int refused. The first 100 coins minted, along with a map that depicted "Olde York County Maine", were mounted in a glass case for presentation. Each was numbered corresponding to the order which the coin was minted. Distribution of coins to the public was supervised by Nichols on behalf of the York County Commemorative Coin Commission. Ten thousand were put aside for Maine residents. The initial burst of enthusiasm saw the allocation for Mainers oversubscribed, and they were sold coins earmarked for out-of-staters. The price was $1.50 for Mainers and $1.65 (including postage) for those living elsewhere. When sales came to a halt in mid-1937, the Commission still had over 6,000 coins remaining. These were retained by the Commission and offered for sale in the 1950s at $15.50 for ten coins; they quickly sold. With the exception of the first 100 coins, the commemoratives were sold in folding paper holders that depicted on their front cover black line drawings of Brown's Garrison and the York National Bank of Saco. Also included were slots to hold up to five more coins, as well as a tissue paper insert that read "We thank you for your interest in our commemorative half dollar, and extend to you the hospitality of York County, Maine. York County Commemorative Coin Commission." By 1940 the York piece sold for about $1.25 in uncirculated condition, though this went up to $2.50 by 1950, $10 by 1960, and $325 by 1985. The deluxe edition of R. S. Yeoman's A Guide Book of United States Coins, published in 2020, lists the coin for between $160 and $220, depending on condition. An exceptional specimen sold for $7,475 in 2008. The original coin holder in which up to five York County half dollars were sent to purchasers are worth from $50 to $125, according to Swiatek (writing in 2012) and if accompanied by original insert up to $150, depending on condit