If you struggle with bad knees and other joints that are always stiff and painful, you’re going to want to see this…

It’s like being able to spray WD-40 right into your joints… except it’s totally natural.

This top arthritis doctor even cancelled his own knee replacement because it works so well!

The reason it’s so effective is because it doesn’t “mask” pain -- but actually helps rebuild worn away joint cartilage.

So if it feels like your joints are rubbing “bone-on-bone”...

This is the only method I’ve found to help fix it without surgery.

The doctor you’ll meet on the next page has X-Ray evidence to prove it.

Best of all…

It doesn’t take weeks to start working.

After trying it for 2 days, the doctor behind this formula said he was already finding it easier to walk long distances.

Find out what it is and see the proof right here.

Roberts








signed to allow combat; when battles take place the player is not taken to an abstract map as in The Stick of Truth. Schroeder said, "when we have to cut away from a certain background for the fighting it kind of broke the feeling of I’m fighting where I’m exploring so we thought about what can we do to make the place I’m exploring also the combat space?" The team considered removing movement from a previously explorable area did not work, so they added movement to combat, which in turn led to the more tactical combat in The Fractured but Whole. Schroeder described the concept as a mixture of Parker's affection for board games and Stone's preference for shooter, action, and sports games. The design team retained the turn-based combat system of The Stick of Truth because it better enabled the implementation of timing for jokes. Parker invited Schroeder and lead designer Ken Strickland to play th e board game Star Wars: Imperial Assault, which helped them develop a unified jargon language and a common understanding of the game's campaign. Later in development, Parker and Stone played early builds of the game, helping them visualize their planned changes. They wrote out ideas for changes and feedback on a whiteboard, which the Ubisoft team used to understand what was required of them. Parker and Stone watched Let's Play videos by PewDiePie of The Stick of Truth to observe a consumer playing it and giving feedback about the game and considering what worked and what did not work. Schroder said the USF team had to adapt to prioritizing comedy and comedic timing over gameplay, meaning it was more important to convey humor than to improve systems. They sometimes needed to step back from the less comfortable aspects of Parker's and Stone's design, at one point contemplating an autoplay option that would complete segments for the player, such as a sequence in which t he 9–10-year-old protagonists give a lap dance in a strip club in a minigame. The team decided allowing players to opt out of the interactivity removed the core of the joke, forcing the player to participate in "this ridiculous thing". Menzel said good interactive comedy was dependent on a more intimate relationship between the joke teller and receiver, and making the player participate or even be responsible for the joke; for instance giving them control over interrogating someone by farting, heightened the South Park hum