Powerball, Mega Millions, Super Lotto, Fantasy, you name it...

There are 275,223,510 different combinations that can be drawn...

And yet for the BIGGEST WINS IN U.S. HISTORY...

40% of the time the first number was a variation of 1 (either 1, 10, or 11)...

45% of the time the winning Powerball was 19 (notice how 1 + 9 = 10?)...

50% of the time the winning Powerball was a variation of 7 (see here why 7 is such a common number and how it appears every 2 weeks...) Want to be even more tripped out?

Check out minute 6:10 of this brief video...

You’ll see how the same four numbers show up in 60% of top lottery jackpots...no exceptions!

See the conclusive proof right here.
 










ost molluscs have only one pair of gills, or even only a singular gill. Generally, the gills are rather like feathers in shape, although some species have gills with filaments on only one side. They divide the mantle cavity so water enters near the bottom and exits near the top. Their filaments have three kinds of cilia, one of which drives the water current through the mantle cavity, while the other two help to keep the gills clean. If the osphradia detect noxious chemicals or possibly sediment entering the mantle cavity, the gills' cilia may stop beating until the unwelcome intrusions have ceased. Each gill has an incoming blood vessel connected to the hemocoel and an outgoing one to the heart. Eating, digestion, and excretion Snail radula at work = Food = Radula = Muscles = Odontophore "belt" Members of the mollusc family use intracellular digestion to function. Most molluscs have muscular mouths with radulae, "tongues& quot;, bearing many rows of chitinous teeth, which are replaced from the rear as they wear out. The radula primarily functions to scrape bacteria and algae off rocks, and is associated with the odontophore, a cartilaginous supporting organ. The radula is unique to the molluscs and has no equivalent in any other animal. Molluscs' mouths also contain glands that secrete slimy mucus, to which the food sticks. Beating cilia (tiny "hairs") drive the mucus towards the stomach, so the mucus forms a long string called a "food string". At the tapered rear end of the stomach and projecting slightly into the hindgut is the prostyle, a backward-pointing cone of feces and mucus, which is rotated by further cilia so it acts as a bobbin, winding the mucus string onto itself. Before the mucus string reaches the prostyle, the acidity of the stomach makes the mucus less sticky and frees parti