Ticket #5710 (new)

Opened 3 weeks ago

Please confirm your shipment right now..

Reported by: "Shipment on Hold" <ShipmentonHold@…> Owned by:
Priority: normal Milestone: 2.11
Component: none Version: 3.8.0
Severity: medium Keywords:
Cc: Language:
Patch status: Platform:

Description

Please confirm your shipment right now..

http://shedazym.co/LMfgN5C500jrU9ikYGkJIDMz6TqLa09PAUaB8Ji71cPqcqN9Pw

http://shedazym.co/Yfa8_MUKMLJJJJHuWXPnwjj3APZHnrlXxuMYcoqMJ8nCv6lSkA

reeding season of the turkey vulture varies according to latitude. In the southern United States, it commences in March, peaks in April to May, and continues into June. In more northerly latitudes, the season starts later and extends into August. Courtship rituals of the turkey vulture involve several individuals gathering in a circle, where they perform hopping movements around the perimeter of the circle with wings partially spread. In the air, one bird closely follows another while flapping and diving.
One chick immediately hatched and one egg not yet hatched

Eggs are generally laid in the nesting site in a protected location such as a cliff, a cave, a rock crevice, a burrow, inside a hollow tree, or in a thicket. There is little or no construction of a nest; eggs are laid on a bare surface. Females generally lay two eggs, but sometimes one and rarely three. The eggs are cream-colored, with brown or lavender spots around their larger end. Both parents incubate, and the young hatch after 30 to 40 days. Chicks are altricial, or helpless at birth. Both adults feed the chicks by regurgitating food for them, and care for them for 10 to 11 weeks. When adults are threatened while nesting, they may flee, or they may regurgitate on the intruder or feign death. If the chicks are threatened in the nest, they defend themselves by hissing and regurgitating. The young fledge at about nine to ten weeks. Family groups remain together until fall.
Feeding
Feeding on a dead gull at Morro Bay, California

The turkey vulture feeds primarily on a wide variety of carrion, from small mammals to large grazers, preferring those recently dead, and avoiding carcasses that have reached the point of putrefaction. They may rarely feed on plant matter, shoreline vegetation, pumpkin, coconut and other crops, live insects and other invertebrates. In South America, turkey vultures have been photographed feeding on the fruits of the introduced oil palm. They rarely, if ever, kill prey themse


untitled-part.html Download

Attachments

untitled-part.html Download (5.0 KB) - added by ShipmentonHold@… 3 weeks ago.
Added by email2trac

Change History

Changed 3 weeks ago by ShipmentonHold@…

Added by email2trac

Changed 3 weeks ago by ShipmentonHold@…

This message has 1 attachment(s)

Changed 3 weeks ago by ShipmentonHold@…

Note: See TracTickets for help on using tickets.