Changes between Version 2 and Version 3 of NQP-rx Operator Precedence Parsing

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Timestamp:
03/22/10 06:29:41 (4 years ago)
Author:
Austin_Hastings
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  • NQP-rx Operator Precedence Parsing

    v2 v3  
    77== Parsing with Optable == 
    88 
    9 A set of generic terminals is defined by `Regex::Cursor`. Those terminals are understood to interact in a particular way in expressions, and your operators have to conform to that understanding. Here's how it works: 
     9A set of generic non-terminals is defined by `Regex::Cursor`. Those productions are understood to interact in a particular way in expressions, and your operators have to conform to that understanding. Here's how it works: 
    1010 
    1111=== EXPR === 
     
    107107=== Identifiers === 
    108108 
    109 You get the `<ident>` target for free - inherited by grammars from Regex::Cursor, which recognizes C-like names (which are the same names used by pretty much every other recent programming language on the planet: letter or underscore to start, then 0 or more letter, underscore, or digit). But that rule is '''not''' automatically a part of `<term>` since maybe you have a different rule for variable names (like Perl). 
     109You get the `<ident>` target for free - inherited by grammars from Regex::Cursor - which recognizes C-like names (which are the same names used by pretty much every other recent programming language on the planet: letter or underscore to start, then 0 or more letter, underscore, or digit). But that rule is '''not''' automatically a part of `<term>` since maybe you have a different rule for variable names (like Perl). 
    110110 
    111111So an easy win is: